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Bucatini "cheese and pepper"

Bucatini


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bucatini are a type of pasta similar to spaghetti but thicker, and the recipe refers to pasta with a lot of pecorino (sheep cheese type) and a lot of pepper.

  • 200 gr pieces
  • 125 gr pecorino cheese
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • black pepper

Servings: 4

Preparation time: less than 30 minutes

HOW TO PREPARE THE RECIPE Bucatini "cheese and pepper":

Put the oil in a pan and add black pepper, according to everyone's preference :)

Put the pasta in boiling salted water and boil it according to the instructions on the package (about 7 minutes).

Separately, grate the pecorino cheese and add a little of the pasta water. Stir until you get a cream.

When the pasta is ready, put it in the pan with oil and mix well. Add the cream cheese and continue mixing.

Serve hot.



History of cheese and pepper paste

Cacio e pepe has its roots in transhumant shepherding. In Roman times shepherds had to make long journeys with their flocks, and they needed to fill their saddlebags with long-lasting foods packed with calories that would give them strength for the journey. Among the foods that the shepherds brought with them were dried tomatoes, bacon, pecorino cheese, hand-prepared and dried spaghetti, and black peppercorns.

Black pepper is a spice that stimulates heat receptors, and therefore it helped shepherds to fight the cold. The seasoned pecorino was chosen for its long shelf life, and spaghetti for its high levels of carbohydrates and calories.

Cacio e pepe pasta thus became a dish spread throughout the Lazio countryside as well as the Umbrian and Abruzzo pastures, until it became a typical dish of Roman taverns.


Ingredients Notes

  • Pasta - bucatini is a thick cut pasta with a hole in the middle making it the perfect vehicle for the sauce.
  • Black pepper - you want to use freshly ground pepper as it is the main flavor profile.
  • Pecorino Romano - made from sheep's milk and adds just the right amount of saltiness. Parmesan can be used as well.
  • Pasta water - pasta releases some if its starches when boiling so it helps create a creamy dish when tossed with the cheese.

Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound bucatini, broken in half
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon very coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon very coarsely ground white pepper
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped cherry tomatoes
  • 1 3/4 cups freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese (6 ounces)
  • Leap

Cook the bucatini in a large pot of boiling, salted water until al dente. Reserve 1/2 cup of the pasta cooking water, then drain the bucatini and return it to the pot. Add the olive oil, black and white pepper and the reserved pasta water. Add the cherry tomatoes and 1 1/2 cups of the cheese, season with salt and toss well. Transfer to a large, warmed pasta bowl and sprinkle with the remaining cheese. Serve at eleven.


  • As I wrote above, cooking your pasta a few minutes prior to al dente is key. And saving a good amount of the starchy pasta water is a must.
  • I like to choose a large enough sauté pan that I know will accommodate the cooked pasta (less dishes to wash!). I start by adding a couple tablespoons of olive oil to the pan and adding the ham in a single layer. Let it crisp slowly.
  • Remove the crisped prosciutto to a cutting board and add the garlic and sage to the pan with another two tablespoons of olive oil. Let them sizzle gently until the garlic is a very light golden and the sage has become crispy. Transfer them to the same cutting board. Now add your pepper to the pan and turn the heat to low while your pasta cooks.
  • This is the point I get the pasta cooking. Make sure you have a large pot of boiling water and salt it well. Add your pasta and set a timer for a couple minutes less than the box says.
  • When the pasta is done, scoop out a couple cups of the water. Then drain your pasta or use tongs to scoop it into the pan with the oil and pepper.
  • Add a handful of cheese and a splash of cooking water and toss to combine. When it looks creamy, repeat with more cheese and more water. Continue this process until all the cheese has been added and the pasta is very creamy. Add more pasta water as needed.
  • Now add the chopped ham, sage, and garlic if using. Toss to combine and serve immediately with plenty of extra Grana Padano.

I hope you’ll give this recipe a try! Let me know if you do. I always love seeing my recipes in your kitchens. xo - Anita

Check out my other pasta recipes:

and a few more coming soon!

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Wild Thistle Kitchen: Creamy Bucatini Cheese and Pepper

Creamy cheese and pepper buns. Photo by Anita Parris Soule. Courtesy Wild Thistle Kitchen.

This creamy bucatini recipe is quick to make, requires a handful of ingredients and is so savory and delicious. It is very much like a bucatini cacio e pepe (but in an effort to avoid the Cacio e Pepe Police, I will not make any claims that this is an authentic cacio e pepe). Yes, it has cheese and pepper, but I & # 8217ve also added some other flavors.

I’m thrilled to be teaming up with Honest Cooking on this Icons of European Taste campaign to bring you this recipe featuring two truly iconic products that are always in my kitchen: Grana Padano Cheese and Prosciutto di Parma. I mean, in the food world, it just doesn’t get more iconic than these two - truly no competition and no comparison to anything else.

I chose to highlight both of these icons in this creamy bucatini cacio e pepe recipe with a few supporting flavors that don’t overshadow them: sage, garlic and plenty of freshly ground black pepper. That’s it. The best food is the simplest.

Let’s learn about the iconic products featured in this creamy bucatini recipe.

These products are special for so many reasons. They are truly one-of-a-kind in taste, texture and quality, but also in that they are each only produced in specific regions of Italy.

Grana Padano cheese has been produced in the Po River plain since the Middle Ages. Wrap your head around that! And Prosciutto di Parma can only come from Parma and can only be made with Italian pork legs.

Each of these products are protected by the PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) system which you will see in the stamps on the rind of Grana Padano cheese, as well as on the exterior of each leg of Parma ham. This means that no other cheeses or hams can claim to be authentic Grana Padano or Prosciutto di Parma.

Now, let’s talk about this pasta.

What is bucatini? Bucatini is a classic, very popular pasta shape. It is similar to spaghetti in shape and length, but it is much thicker and has a small hole in the center. It’s really fun to make and eat - a little messy but totally worth it. In fact, it is known as “sporca camicie” in some regions of Italy, which literally translates to “dirty shirts”! I love that little foodie fact I heard it on a travel show many years ago and I’ve never forgotten.

Photo by Anita Parris Soule. Courtesy Wild Thistle Kitchen.

Cooking it to al dente or “to the tooth” is key, as with all pasta recipes, but especially here, because we will finish cooking it in the pan with pasta water and lots of Grana Padano cheese. So I even take it out a couple minutes prior to being al dente to ensure I have that toothsome bite in the finished dish.

Cacio = cheese and pepe = pepper. I am riffing on the classic here and using copious amounts of Grana Padano, as well as adding a few supporting flavors. The flavors in this creamy bucatini recipe echo one of my favorite dishes: veal or chicken saltimbocca. The ham and sage pair beautifully with the cheese and create such a harmonious dish.

I encourage you to hunt down Grana Padano and Prosciutto di Parma and use them in your kitchen. If you are making this recipe, before you start, make sure to put out some rough chunks of Grana Padano and some silky ribbons of Prosciutto di Parma to nibble on as you’re cooking. Pour some crisp Italian white wine and savor the taste - really enjoy the cooking process!

Tips on making this creamy bucatini cheese and pepper…

As I wrote above, cooking your pasta a few minutes prior to al dente is key. And saving a good amount of the starchy pasta water is a must. I like to choose a large enough sauté pan that I know will accommodate the cooked pasta (less dishes to wash). I start by adding a couple tablespoons of olive oil to the pan and adding the ham in a single layer. Let it crisp slowly.

Remove the crisped prosciutto to a cutting board and add the garlic and sage to the pan with another two tablespoons of olive oil. Let them sizzle gently until the garlic is a very light golden and the sage has become crispy. Transfer them to the same cutting board. Now add your pepper to the pan and turn the heat to low while your pasta cooks.

This is the point I get the pasta cooking. Make sure you have a large pot of boiling water and salt it well. Add your pasta and set a timer for a couple minutes less than the box says.

When the pasta is done, scoop out a couple cups of the water. Then drain your pasta or use tongs to scoop it into the pan with the oil and pepper.

Add a handful of cheese and a splash of cooking water and toss to combine. When it looks creamy, repeat with more cheese and more water. Continue this process until all the cheese has been added and the pasta is very creamy. Add more pasta water as needed.

Now add the chopped ham, sage and garlic (if using). Toss to combine and serve immediately with plenty of extra Grana Padano.

I hope you’ll give this recipe a try! Let me know if you do. I always love seeing my recipes in your kitchens.

Photo by Anita Parris Soule. Courtesy Wild Thistle Kitchen.

Creamy Bucatini Cheese and Pepper

1 lb. dried bucatini pasta

5 thin slices of Prosciutto di Parma

4 oz. Grana Padano Cheese, grated (about 2 cups)

2 garlic cloves, peeled and cut in half

2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup kosher salt or sea salt for pasta water

Set a large pot of water on to boil over high heat. In a large sauté pan, add 2 tablespoons of olive oil and add the ham in a single layer. Let it crisp slowly over medium low heat.

Remove the crisped prosciutto to a cutting board and add the garlic and sage to the pan with another 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Let them sizzle gently until the garlic is a very light golden and the sage has become crispy. Transfer them to the same cutting board as the ham. Now add your pepper to the pan and turn the heat to low while your pasta cooks.

Once water comes to a full, rolling boil, add lots of salt - I usually add about ¼ cup of kosher or sea salt. Add your pasta and set a timer for a couple minutes less than the box says.

When the pasta is done, scoop out a couple cups of the water and set aside. Then drain your pasta in a colander or use tongs to scoop it into the pan with the oil and pepper.

Keep the pan over low heat and add a handful of cheese and a splash of cooking water and toss and stir to combine (I like to use tongs for this). When it looks creamy, repeat with more cheese and more water. Continue this process until all the cheese has been added and the pasta is very creamy. Add more pasta water as needed.

Now add the chopped ham, sage and garlic (if using). Toss to combine and serve immediately with plenty of extra Grana Padano.


Ingredients

Cook the bucatini in plenty of water and a little salt! The pecorino will later give the right degree of flavor to the dish, so adjust to salt the water!

Meanwhile, prepare the finely grated cheese in a bowl.

Cook the pasta a little more al dente than usual, then put a couple of ladles (or more) of pasta cooking water aside and drain one two minutes earlier than usual.

Put the pasta in a large pan.

Let the cooking water cool (it should NOT be boiling!), Then pour about 120 g on the cheese. Stir to form a cream that is smooth and not too thick, then adjust.

If you want you can further refine the cream with a few pulses of immersion blender.

Finally, pour the cream cheese over the pasta and quickly melt it off the heat (or on the stove but at a minimum). If necessary, add a little more lukewarm cooking water.

Serve the bucatini cheese and pepper with a dusting of freshly ground pepper.

THE PASTA

Tradition wants you to use a pasta size & # 8220long & # 8221 such as spaghetti, spaghetti, bucatini or fresh & # 8220tonnarelli & # 8221.

Do a little at home as you see fit, but know that if you use rigatoni or another format, you are voluntarily transgressing!

THE "CHEAT"

And here you can not transgress, in fact & # 8220we talk & # 8221 of pecorino romano and that's it!

Some, and even some restaurateurs, add a small percentage of Parmesan cheese, but it seems fair to me to want to meet the tastes of customers or their own taste.

THE PEPPER

Preferably use the peppercorns, their aroma is truly unique! In fact, the suggestion is to enhance the whole aroma of the pepper, heating the grains for a few seconds in a very hot pan.

Finally, use a classic pepper grinder or a heavy pestle to chop it!

FOLLOW ME UP TOO INSTAGRAM just click on Segue! I'm waiting for you!


The pepper is really nice when it’s coarse. Use a coarse grinder or wrap whole peppercorns in a few paper towels and crush them on a cutting board with the flat side of a meat mallet. Initially the pepper can be pan roasted to bring out even more flavor prior to tossing in the pasta and cheese.


Authentic Cheese and Pepper Recipe

This is an authentic Bucatini Cacio e Pepe recipe! Most of the recipes I see are definitely NOT authentic Cacio e Pepe recipes, and may more appropriately be called Italian Mac and Cheese. The traditional Cacio e Pepe pasta, cheese, and method for making this treasured Roman dish leave little room for reinvention. Although a creamy Cacio e Pepe does take some finesse, and would be easier if there was a Cacio e Pepe sauce, I like to stick to the real deal Roman recipe. And with these tips, you’ll find it’s not so hard after all. Here’s what you need for an authentic Cacio e Pepe ricetta (recipe).

Traditional Cacio and Pepe Pastas

If you want to know how to make Cacio e Pepe like a roman, the first step is to use a traditional Cacio e Pepe pasta which are bucatini, spaghetti, or tonnarelli. In the U.S., tonarelli cacio e pepe will be the most difficult to make as the pasta is harder to find. Personally, I prefer the thicker long pasta with a whole in the middle, so our authentic Cacio e Pepe recipe uses bucatini pasta. But spaghetti cheese and pepper will certainly still be delicious especially if that’s what’s in your pantry.

Bucatini pasta for an authentic Cacio e Pepe recipe

Traditional Cacio and Pepe Cheese

Traditional Roman recipes use ingredients from Rome or the surrounding region. So, the cheese to be used for authentic Cacio e Pepe recipes is either Pecorino Romano, Cacio de Roma, or a combination of these two Roman cheeses. Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, or Parm as we sometimes call it, comes from Parma in the foodie region of Emilia-Romagna. In the states, Pecorino Romano is readily available, so that is our cheese of choice for this Bucatini Cacio e Pepe recipe. Of course, if you can't get that, or prefer Parm, it will make a good substitution.

No matter what, do not use pre-grated cheese. It will not melt or combine well, and your Cacio e Pepe pasta will most likely be lumpy.

Authentic Cheese and Pepper Recipe

Whether you’re making Cacio and Pepe Bucatini, spaghetti, or tonnarelli, the method is the same. There is no “Cheese and Pepper Sauce” per se. And a Cacio e Pepe recipe does not include butter, olive oil, or cream! That’s a dead giveaway that you are not using an authentic Cacio e Pepe recipe. When making true Roman Cacio e Pepe, the ingredients are combined in a way that makes the pasta creamy-saucy without making a separate sauce or using additional ingredients.

However, with the burst in popularity of pasta cacio de pepe, many restaurants even in Italy are making a separate sauce to use on everything from pizza to croquettes. But the best Cacio e Pepe Rome has to offer is still traditional Cacio e Pepe pasta.

The 3 ingredients for our Bucatini Cacio e Pepe recipe


Details

Ingredients

  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 1 pound dried bucatini
  • 1 stick unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups Parmesan, grated, plus more for garnish
  • Thyme, fresh, for garnish

Method

Step 1

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the bucatini and cook until al dente, 8 to 9 minutes. Then drain, reserving 1 cup of the pasta water.

Step 2

Meanwhile, in another large pot, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Cook, whisking constantly, until golden brown and nutty in aroma, 5 to 6 minutes.

Step 3

To the butter, add the black pepper, followed by the drained pasta, reserved pasta water and the grated Parmesan. Cook, tossing constantly until the cheese melts and the pasta water forms a thick sauce coating the noodles, 1 to 2 minutes.

Step 4

Divide between bowls, garnish with grated Parmesan and thyme leaves, then serve.



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