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The Daily Meal’s Ultimate Guide to Cookies

The Daily Meal’s Ultimate Guide to Cookies



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Enjoy everything you need to know about America’s favorite baked treat

Thinkstock/iStockphoto

These are classic cookies from around the world.

What’s not to love about cookies? Round, square, long, or short; cookies come any way you like them covered in creamy chocolate chips, loaded with crunchy nuts, or even sprinkled in festive spices.

The editors of The Daily Meal love cookies just as much as anyone, which is why we’ve devoted an entire page to everything having to do with cookies. Whether you’re in search for recipes of the classics or looking for some new inspiration for how to use your cookies, our Ultimate Guide to Cookies will have everything you need plus best recipes and tips for making them.

So whether you’re baking for the holidays or a cookie fanatic like us, take a bite out of cookies with The Daily Meal and enjoy our Ultimate Guide to Cookies.


Anne Dolce is the Cook Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @anniecdolce


The Ultimate Guide to Baking Your Best Chocolate Chip Cookies

Not all chocolate chip cookies are created equally. Check out our handy comparison chart to see how different types of fat and flour affect a recipe.

When you think about it, making chocolate chip cookies (or any baked treat) is a science experiment. If you have all the proper ingredients and the chemistry works, the experiment is a success with delicious results.਋utter and sugar are creamed together before adding dry ingredients such as flour, baking soda, and salt before heated to just the right temperature. And using properly-measured ingredients is essential in making sure the finished result is the correct texture and flavor. Thankfully, the Better Homes & Gardens Test Kitchen has tested all sorts of chocolate chip cookie variations so you don&apost suffer a failed experiment when making alterations or substitutions to your recipe.


Incredible Bakery Cookies from Coast to Coast

In addition to turning out textbook renditions of classics such as kunefe (a sweet Levantine cheese pastry) and Umm-ali (an Egyptian-style bread pudding), this unassuming Cambridge bakery and cafe serving Middle Eastern-inspired sweets and savories imbues the flavor profiles of Turkey, Greece and Lebanon into Americana staples. Take pastry chef and co-owner Maura Kilpatrick's oatmeal cookie. This is not your Moosewood-era hockey puck. At Sofra, she mixes a little tahini into the batter, which gives the cookie a touch of nuttiness and a softer texture due to its higher fat content. She also jazzes it up with candied orange peel and a pinch of spice mixture called Dessert Rose, composed of halvah, cardamom, sesame seeds and rose petals, for that extra exotic touch.

Photo courtesy of Sofra

Denver: Victory Love + Cookies

Some of Kristy Greenwood's top-selling cookies include the Lemon Lucy and Booty Bars, but our favorite is the Strawberry Margarita. The cocktail-inspired treat originated as a raspberry lemonade cookie, but one day Greenwood wondered, "Why should the kids have all the fun?" So she switched the lemon to lime, removed the raspberries, and added freeze-dried strawberries and lots of booze. And because of Colorado's high altitude, she discovered that adding more liquid in a recipe is beneficial, so adding both tequila and Triple Sec as well as lime oil worked perfectly. To finish them off, Greenwood sprays the hot cookies as they come out of the oven with a mixture of tequila and Triple Sec. Not in Denver? No worries she ships the cookies, and they’re way cheaper than a Key West vacation.

New York City: Milk Bar

Kitchen Sink. Garbage Cookies. Whatever you call them, there's no denying that Christina Tosi struck gold when she synthesized America's guilty pleasures into her infamous Compost Cookie®. Like most inventions, the cookie that launched a thousand copycats was born out of necessity. As Tosi explains in the Milk Bar Cookbook, her co-worker developed the recipe when they were working on a remote island off New Hampshire where food deliveries were unpredictable. Back then, the cookies were always different, based on whatever ingredients the kitchen could get their hands on today, the standard recipe is a sweet and salty kaleidoscope of Tosi's favorite munchies — chocolate and butterscotch chips, potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers and coffee grounds. Get your fix at all six Milk Bar locations in New York as well as at Milk Bar in Toronto.

Photo courtesy of Momofuku Milk Bar

Seattle: Hello Robin

The awesomely named Mackles'more at Hello Robin isn't the only reason we love this Seattle bakery, but it sure brings a smile to our face. Named for its most-famous Capitol Hill resident (who apparently is a fan), these graham cracker cookies topped with marshmallow, cinnamon-spiked chocolate chip cookie dough and dark chocolate from Seattle-based Theo are the epitome of local civic pride. Owner Robin Wehl Martin gained fame for her award-winning whoopie pies before opening up her storefront on the encouragement of local ice cream entrepreneur Molly Moon, who uses Hello Robin’s cookies for her ice cream sandwiches and operates a seasonal walk-up "scoop station" in front of the bakery from May to September. Other top sellers include habanero-chocolate chip, curry-and-white chocolate and a signature breakfast cookie that combines oatmeal, shredded carrots, mini chocolate chips and other secret tasty bits.

Photo by Sarah Flotard

Yountville, Calif., Las Vegas, New York, Beverly Hills: Bouchon Bakery

When is an Oreo not an Oreo? When it's reengineered to the perfectionist ideals of chef Thomas Keller. Sure, the namesake chocolate bouchons are a main draw at Keller's archipelago of bakeries in Yountville, Calif., Las Vegas and Beverly Hills, but we have a sweet spot for his reimagined down-home classics like Oh Ohs (a variation of a Hostess Ho Hos) and America's favorite sandwich cookie. For the TKOs (Thomas Keller Oreos, get it?), chocolate shortbread cookies made from chocolate sable dough mixed with Valrhona cocoa powder are sandwiched around a stuffing of white Valrhona chocolate ganache that replaces the Lord-knows-what in the traditional filling. (No word on any plans for a double-stuffed version.) Find TKOs at any of the Bouchon Bakery outposts, or try your hand at them yourself — the recipe is featured in the Bouchon Bakery cookbook.

Photo by Deborah Jones

Chicago: Cookie Bar Gluten Free Bakery

Even wheat eaters love Cookie Bar, Chicago's only gluten-free bakery. Unlike gluten-free bakeries that rely on potato starch and white rice flour (which can give gluten-free desserts a starchy, heavy and, frankly, bad name), this Ravenswood bakery employs a mix of higher-protein, high-fiber grains such as amaranth, quinoa, sorghum and teff to ensure that its seasonal pies, quadruple-decker sandwich cookies and Mississippi mud cakes emerge moist and light. One of their best-sellers is these oversized Salted Caramel Nutella Brownies hitting on all cylinders, they're at once sweet, salty, fudgy and ludicrously delicious. Gilding the lily are a drizzle of white chocolate and a glaze of housemade salted caramel, studded with organic Mediterranean set salt that adds an earthy crunch and a savory counterpoint to the rich smoothness of the Nutella. They’re sold by the half and full dozen at the store, at CookieBarOnline.com and on the bakery's new all-brownie site, BrownieBar.net. Pass the almond milk!

Photo courtesy of Cookie Bar Gluten Free Bakery

Minneapolis: Salty Tart Bakery

Don't wait until Passover to dig into Michelle Gayer's coconut macaroons at the Salty Tart Bakery in Midtown Global Market in Minneapolis. Featured on Andrew Zimmern's The Best Thing I Ever Ate, Gayer has been turning out these addictively coconut-y cookies since her days as a pastry chef at Charlie Trotter's in Chicago, and they didn’t earn their nickname — "crack-a-roons" — for nothing. Putting the "deli" in delicacy, Gayer binds the shredded coconut with a touch of cream cheese, creating a cookie that's crunchy on the outside and lusciously soft and creamy when you bite into it. These (naturally) gluten-free goodies are a perennial favorite at her shop and at the annual Minnesota State Fair last year she sold approximately 18,000 in one day.

Los Angeles: The Sycamore Kitchen

There's much to love on the savory side of Michelin-starred chefs Karen and Quinn Hatfield's casual La Brea breakfast and lunch spot (a few doors down from their newest restaurant Odys and Penelope), but we recommend you save room for their desserts such as salted caramel pecan babka. You can also just swing by for a cookie fix. The kid in us has a weakness for their Rice Crispy Cookie. Elevating everyone's favorite lunchbox treat, the duo shape-shifts the traditional marshmallow bar into a cookie, then ups the ante by folding in their own housemade puffed rice and two kinds of chocolate (Callebaut dark and Guittard milk). Pro tip? All of Sycamore Kitchen's pastries are half-price from 4:30 to 5 p.m., but we can’t promise the RKT-inspired goodness won't sell out before then.

Photo courtesy of The Sycamore Kitchen

San Francisco: Batter Bakery

A staple since the bakery's inception, these Peanut Butter Blossoms are so decadent that one of its original wholesale outlets (Trouble Coffee) renamed them Sweet Jesus. A hybrid of two childhood favorites, the batter contain two types of peanut butter (smooth and natural) and is enriched by sweetened condensed milk, which gives it a delightfully chewy interior. And as if that weren't peanut butter-y enough, bite-sized peanut butter cups are pressed into the still-warm cookies as they come out of the oven. Seems simple, but the hand-formed cookies are extremely temperature-sensitive, which is why they're not always available at the bakery's satellite outposts — a downtown kiosk and a stall at the Ferry Plaza farmers market on Tuesdays and Saturdays. If bars are more your jam, Batter also has a strong following for its brownies, carmelitas and almond butter-espresso blondies.

San Diego: The Cravory

Herbaceous rosemary, rich extra virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar reduction, and just a hint of lemon and black pepper. No, we're not talking about tonight's dinner special it's one of the most-sought-after treats at this cookie-only San Diego bakery. Also known for its Pancakes and Bacon Cookie (made from actual pancake batter and accented with hand-chopped smoked bacon bits and a touch of maple syrup), The Cravory isn't afraid to mine the hot kitchen's toolkit to fill its cookie jars. In addition to the Point Loma shop, their daily rotating menu of cookies is sold at San Diego farmers markets, various airport terminals and sweet shops (including Dylan's Candy Bar), and online, where they can be ordered by the dozen or as part of a freshly baked monthly subscription shipped anywhere in the United States.

Photo by Garrett Richardson

Multiple Locations: Insomnia Cookies

A bakery that delivers still-warm cookies to starving students until 3 a.m.? Genius. Founder Seth Berkowitz undoubtedly hit on a killer app back in 2003 (almost a decade before the era of on-demand food delivery services) when he launched a warm-cookie delivery service for his fellow University of Pennsylvania students from his dorm room. Now boasting 65 storefronts in 23 cities, Insomnia Cookies sates late-night munchies far and wide. More than 12 different cookie flavors, along with brownies, cookie cakes and ice cream sandwiches, are shuttled straight from their ovens to your doorstep from noon to 3 a.m. in most cities, but a perennial crowd favorite is the S'mores Deluxe, a chocolate cookie base loaded with chocolate chunks, pieces of graham cracker and melted mini marshmallows. And yes, milk and water are also available for delivery.

Photo by Felicia Pascarella

Columbus, Ohio: Rogue Bakery

The bakers behind this delivery-only bakery are every bit as rogue as their name suggests. Brick and mortar? Forget about it. Fried-chicken cookie? Why the heck not? This tongue-and-cheek company working out of a local incubator was known only to its Twitter following until its Ranch cookie was featured on ABC’s The Chew. As owner Carl Acampado points out, the Ranch doesn’t actually have America’s favorite salad dressing in the batter they just share the same ingredients. "It looks and feels like a normal cookie, but taking a bite reminds you of a totally different eating experience," he says. "Sure, it's weird, but in a fun and strange way." Rogue also rolls out seasonal specials, but we’re not talking pumpkin and peppermint. Each year around Thanksgiving, they release a Stuffing cookie that incorporates a mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery) and herbs.

Photo courtesy of Rogue Bakery

San Francisco: Dough & Co

Let's be honest: The best thing about baking cookies is, well, sneaking the dough out of the mixer. Sure, your mother warned you about the dangers of eating raw eggs, but old habits die hard. And thanks to one San Francisco cookie entrepreneur, they don't have to. Dough & Co founder Omar Mamoon hit upon the Holy Grail — an eggless chocolate chip dough that that’s delicious to eat baked or raw. Mamoon pursued alternative binders and discovered that finely ground white chia seeds resulted in a nutty-tasting batter, helped with shelf life and made the cookies all-around healthier. You'll find Dough & Co chocolate chip cookies — baked and finished off with Maldon sea salt — at scores of San Francisco restaurants, and offered as a topping option at various frozen yogurt shops. But chances are you'll want to buy the raw cookie-dough logs and devour them right out of the fridge.


Recipe Summary

  • 11 ounces all-purpose flour
  • 12 graham cracker rectangles, crushed (1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs)
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 ¼ cups (10 oz.) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 ¼ cups dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup plus 2 Tbsp. granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 8 (1.55-oz.) milk chocolate bars (such as Hershey&rsquos), each broken into 6 pieces
  • 22 jumbo marshmallows, halved crosswise

Whisk together flour, cracker crumbs, baking powder, salt, and baking soda in a medium bowl. Set aside.

Beat together butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar with a stand mixer at medium-high speed until very light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating to incorporate. After adding both eggs, continue to beat until very whipped, 3 to 4 minutes. Add vanilla.

Reduce speed to low, and gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture. Beat until combined, about 10 seconds.

Scoop cookies with a 1 1/2-inch scoop about 2 inches apart onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Flatten cookies slightly, and press a chocolate piece into each cookie. Top each with a halved marshmallow. Cover baking sheets with plastic wrap, and chill at least 24 hours, and up to 48 hours (or alternatively, freeze about 15 minutes).

Preheat a convection oven to 450°F (or a conventional oven to 425°F). Bake cookies in preheated oven on lined baking sheets until puffed and golden and marshmallow is browned, about 7 minutes. Let cookies stand about 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool until set, about 5 more minutes.


All Daniel Fast Recipes

Food groups allowed on the Daniel Fast are whole grains, beans, legumes, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and some oils. Restricted items are animal products (meat, fish, eggs, and dairy), sugar and artificial sweeteners, caffeine, yeast and leavening agents, deep-fried foods, and processed foods. For more specific details on the food guidelines, refer to my Daniel Fast Food List.

You don’t have to worry about coming up with recipes on your fast. I’ve already done the work for you! Take advantage of the resources in my book, The Ultimate Guide to the Daniel Fast 100+ recipes, three weeks of meal plans, and grocery shopping lists.

My website also provides hundreds of Daniel Fast friendly dishes for you to enjoy. Browse through the nine categories of recipes below to find what you need. And don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone when it comes to your food choices on your Daniel Fast. Try something new!


The Ultimate Guide to Making and Decorating Sugar Cookies Like the Pros

Follow these 10 tips—which span from dough to delivery—to make the best sugar cookie recipe of all time, and get ready for Christmas cookie success.

Decorating sugar cookies always seems like a good idea, but they never quite turn out like the ones baked by the professionals. Even if you stick to the recipe you&aposve been baking for decades, there are a handful of tips to keep in mind to make sure your cookies don’t crumble. Follow these tips—which span from਍ough to delivery—to make the best sugar cookies of all time, and get ready for Christmas cookie success.

Trying to roll out freshly made sugar cookie dough is nearly impossible. It’s too soft, too sticky, and totally unwieldy. It can be tempting to just stick the soft dough in the freezer to speed things up, but that won’t work either: The dough will be frozen on the outside and too soft on the inside. The verdict? It’s a good idea to make it at least a day before you bake. In fact, dough will last double-wrapped in the freezer for more than a month, and can be kept in the fridge for three to four days. “I go ahead and portion the dough into little balls and chill them on a cookie sheet, then put the chilled cookie balls in a bag in the freezer to use later,” says Sarah Rich, pastry chef at Rich Table in San Francisco, Calif. When you’re ready to bake, let the dough thaw slightly, then roll between two sheets of parchment paper to just under a quarter-inch thick, says Jen Yee, head of the pastry program at Lafayette in New York City. The chilling process also gives the gluten in the dough time to relax, which makes for a more tender cookie.


Are Thai Curries Supposed to Be Sweet?

Order from nearly any Thai restaurant in America and you’ll be faced with a rainbow list of curries (green, yellow, red) with customizable proteins (shrimp, chicken, beef, pork, tofu). And more likely than not, the coconut milk broth in that curry will be sweet—as in, added-sugar sweet. Lots of added sugar. Is this how they’re supposed to be? Are curries in Thailand this sweet, or is this some adaptation for American tastes?

First, let’s back up and consider the principles of Thai seasoning. The concept of balance is crucial in Thai cooking. Texture, color, appearance, as well as the flavor balance: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy —nothing should be out of alignment. “Thai food… [is] about the juggling of disparate elements to create a harmonious finish,” writes David Thompson.

And, while you can taste curries in Thailand as sweet (or nearly so) as their American cousins, the topline answer here is no: Thai curries are not supposed to be sugary-sweet. Sweetness is an element, but it should exist in balance, not dominating, never taking over. So tell your curry cook to tone down the sweetness, please.


50 Chocolate Chip Cookies

There's something for everyone in this big batch of recipes!

Related To:

June 2018 Fun Cooking

  • Use room-temperature eggs — the dough will be easier to combine. If you’re short on time, place the eggs in a bowl of warm water for 5 to 10 minutes.
  • Use an ice cream scoop to evenly portion dough.
  • Leave 2 to 3 inches of space between each scoop of dough on the baking sheets — the cookies will spread a bit.
  • Bake cookies in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and switch the position of the pans halfway through.
  • Don’t overbake — cookies will set as they cool.

New Ways with Chicken Breast

1. Chocolate-Hazelnut Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, melting the butter and adding 1/2 cup chocolate-hazelnut spread. Use only 1/2 cup brown sugar. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped toasted hazelnuts with the chocolate chips.

New Ways with Chicken Breast

2. S’mores Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 1/4 cups flour add 1/2 cup finely ground graham crackers to the flour mixture. Use milk chocolate chips instead of semisweet. Pipe marshmallow cream on the warm cookies let set.

3. Mexican Chocolate Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus 1/3 cup almond flour add 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon to the flour mixture. Use dark brown sugar instead of light. Replace the chocolate chips with chopped Mexican chocolate.

4. Macadamia Nut Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the semisweet chocolate chips with 1/2 cup each milk chocolate chips, white chocolate chips and chopped salted macadamia nuts.

5. Malted Milk Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 3/4 cup malted milk powder to the flour mixture omit the salt. Use only 1/2 cup brown sugar use 1 tablespoon vanilla. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 3/4 cup each milk chocolate chips and chopped crispy chocolate bars.

6. Dipped Mocha Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using dark brown sugar beat in 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder with the butter. Stir in 1/3 cup chopped chocolate-covered espresso beans with the chocolate chips. Make the dip: Melt 4 ounces chopped semisweet chocolate with 1/4 cup heavy cream and 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder. Dip the cooled cookies halfway and let set.

Mix and Match Deviled Eggs_ May Insert

7. Caramel Corn Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1/2 cup brown sugar along with 1/2 cup dulce de leche. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 1/2 cup each milk chocolate chips and chocolate chunks. Drizzle the cooled cookies with dulce de leche and top with chopped caramel corn.

Mix and Match Deviled Eggs_ May Insert

8. Snack Attack Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, stirring in 1 cup lightly crushed potato chips and 1/2 cup broken pretzels with the chocolate chips. Bake 15 to 16 minutes.

9. Giant Salted Caramel Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies stir in 1/2 cup chopped toasted walnuts with the chocolate chips. Pat the dough into a buttered 10-inch cast-iron skillet, then press in 12 chocolate-covered chewy caramels. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt. Bake at 375 degrees F until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 30 minutes. Cool.

10. Cranberry Pecan Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using 2/3 cup each semisweet chocolate chips and milk chocolate chips stir in 2/3 cup each rolled oats, sweetened shredded coconut, dried cranberries and chopped pecans. Drop 1/4 cupfuls of dough (about 10) onto parchment-lined baking sheets. Bake at 350 degrees F, 20 to 25 minutes.

11. Blueberry-Cornmeal Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 1/4 cups flour, plus 1/4 cup yellow cornmeal. Use 1/2 cup each chocolate chips and fresh blueberries. Roll the balls of dough in turbinado sugar before baking.

Mix and Match Deviled Eggs_ May Insert

12. Chocolate-Raspberry Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1/4 cup dark cocoa powder to the flour mixture. Use only 3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips stir in 1/2 cup each white chocolate chips and lightly crushed freeze-dried raspberries.

13. Cream Cheese-Stuffed Strawberry Mix 6 ounces softened cream cheese with 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla until smooth freeze until firm, about 1 hour. Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, stirring in 3/4 cup chopped freeze-dried strawberries. Flatten each ball of dough, place 1 teaspoon of the cream cheese mixture in the center, then form the dough around it, rolling until smooth.

14. Peanut-Raisin Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the semisweet chocolate chips with 1/3 cup each milk chocolate chips, bittersweet chocolate chips, dark chocolate chips, raisins and salted peanuts.

15. Oatmeal Raisin Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 1/4 cups flour add 1 cup rolled oats and 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon to the flour mixture. Stir in 1/2 cup golden raisins with the chocolate chips.

16. Ginger-Molasses Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1/2 teaspoon each ground ginger and cinnamon and 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves to the flour mixture. Replace the light brown sugar with 1/3 cup dark brown sugar, 1/4 cup granulated sugar and 3 tablespoons molasses. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped crystallized ginger with the chocolate chips. Roll the balls of dough in turbinado sugar before baking.

17. Honey-Almond Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1/4 cup brown sugar, plus 1/4 cup honey. Use 2 teaspoons vanilla. Stir in 1/2 cup toasted sliced almonds with the chocolate chips.

18. Butterscotch-Pecan Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the semisweet chocolate chips with 3/4 cup butterscotch chips and 1/2 cup each bittersweet chocolate chips and chopped pecans.

19. Bourbon-Brown Butter Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, browning the butter in a skillet over medium heat, swirling, 8 to 10 minutes let cool. Replace the light brown sugar with 3/4 cup dark brown sugar and 1/4 cup granulated sugar. Beat in 2 tablespoons bourbon with the vanilla. Replace the chocolate chips with chopped dark chocolate.

20. Cinnamon Sugar Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using milk chocolate chips instead of semisweet. Roll the balls of dough in cinnamon sugar before baking. Whisk 1/3 cup confectioners’ sugar with 1 teaspoon water and 1/4 teaspoon vanilla drizzle over the cooled cookies.

21. Tropical Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 2 tablespoons dark rum and 1/2 teaspoon coconut extract with the vanilla. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 1/2 cup each milk chocolate chips and white chocolate chips stir in 1 cup chopped candied pineapple.

22. Whole Wheat Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using 1 cup all-purpose flour and 1/2 cup whole-wheat flour add 2 tablespoons wheat germ to the flour mixture. Use 1 tablespoon vanilla.

23. Tahini Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 stick butter. Beat in 1/2 cup tahini before adding the egg.

24. Rye and Millet Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using 1/2 cup each all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour and light rye flour and 1/4 cup oat flour. Stir in 1/2 cup dry millet with the chocolate chips.

25. Tassies Make Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the chocolate chips with 4 ounces chopped semisweet chocolate. Divide heaping teaspoons among 36 buttered mini-muffin cups, filling each about two-thirds full. Bake as directed.

26. Salted Olive Oil Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the vegetable oil with extra-virgin olive oil. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 1 1/4 cups bittersweet chocolate chips. Sprinkle with flaky salt before baking.

New Ways with Chicken Breast

27. Chocolate-Mint Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1/4 cup dark cocoa powder to the flour mixture. Replace the vanilla with 1/2 teaspoon peppermint extract. Replace the chocolate chips with roughly chopped mint chocolate. Melt 4 ounces chopped white chocolate with 2 teaspoons coconut oil, then stir in 1 to 2 drops green food coloring drizzle over the cooled cookies.

Mix and Match Deviled Eggs_ May Insert

28. Candied Orange Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest with the vanilla. Replace the chocolate chips with 4 ounces chopped bittersweet chocolate. Stir in 1/4 cup chopped candied orange peel. Dip the cooled cookies into 12 ounces melted bittersweet chocolate and top with more chopped candied orange peel. Let set.

New Ways with Chicken Breast

29. Chile-Spiced Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 2 teaspoons ancho chile powder and 1/4 teaspoon cayenne to the flour mixture.

30. Sesame Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds to the flour mixture. Use 3 tablespoons vegetable oil and 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil. Replace the chocolate chips with dark chocolate chunks.

31. Coconut Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the vegetable oil with melted coconut oil. Add 1/4 teaspoon coconut extract with the vanilla. Stir in 1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut with the chocolate chips.

32. Cracked Black Pepper Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper to the flour mixture. Replace the chocolate chips with 8 ounces chopped bittersweet chocolate.

33. Cardamom Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom to the flour mixture. Replace the water with orange blossom water. Use 3/4 cup each semisweet chocolate chips and white chocolate chips.

34. Chai Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 2 tablespoons loose chai tea (from about 7 bags) to the flour mixture. Steep 1 chai tea bag in 3 tablespoons hot milk for 5 minutes, then whisk into 1 cup confectioners’ sugar drizzle over the cooled cookies.

35. Maple Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 2 tablespoons brown sugar, plus 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup. Add 1 teaspoon maple extract with the vanilla. Use bittersweet chocolate chips instead of semisweet.

36. Toffee Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the brown sugar with 1/4 cup golden syrup (such as Lyle’s). Use 1/2 cup each semisweet chocolate chips and milk chocolate chips stir in 1/2 cup toffee chips.

37. Beer-Glazed Reserve 3 tablespoons beer from one 12-ounce bottle wheat beer. Simmer the remaining beer in a saucepan over medium heat until reduced to 1/4 cup, 5 to 7 minutes let cool. Make Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 2 tablespoons brown sugar add 1/2 teaspoon finely grated orange zest. Omit the water and add the reduced beer. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 1 cup milk chocolate chips. Whisk 1 cup confectioners’ sugar with the reserved 3 tablespoons beer drizzle over the cooled cookies.

38. Whoopie Pie Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 3/4 cups flour add 1/4 cup dark cocoa powder to the flour mixture. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 3/4 cup each white chocolate chips and dark chocolate chips. Once cooled, flip over half the cookies and top each with a marshmallow. Bake at 350 degrees F until the marshmallows are soft, 3 minutes. Sandwich with the remaining cookies.

39. Cherry-Dark Chocolate Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 3/4 cups flour add 1/4 cup dark cocoa powder to the flour mixture. Replace the chocolate chips with 1 cup chocolate chunks stir in 1 cup dried cherries.

40. Cookies and Cream Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, replacing the chocolate chips with 1/2 cup mini chocolate chips stir in 1 1/4 cups chopped chocolate sandwich cookies.

41. Cookie Butter Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1/4 cup brown sugar, plus 1/2 cup speculoos (cookie butter). Use 3/4 cup each semisweet chocolate chips and milk chocolate chips.

42. Peanut Butter and Jelly Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, using an extra 1/4 cup flour. Add 1/3 cup peanut butter with the butter. Omit the sour cream. Replace the chocolate chips with 3/4 cup mini chocolate chips. Make an indentation in the center of each dough scoop using the back of a measuring spoon and freeze until chilled, about 30 minutes. Fill each indentation with strawberry jam. Bake 12 to 14 minutes.

Mix and Match Deviled Eggs_ May Insert

Red Velvet-White Chocolate (No. 43)

Red Velvet-White Chocolate (No. 43)

43. Red Velvet–White Chocolate Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder to the flour mixture. Stir 2 teaspoons red gel food coloring into the sour cream. Use white chocolate chips instead of semisweet.

44. Sweet Almond Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, beating 1/3 cup almond paste with the butter. Use 1 1/2 cups flour and 3/4 teaspoon salt. Replace the vanilla with 1/4 teaspoon almond extract add 1 tablespoon amaretto. Omit the sour cream. Use only 1 cup chocolate chips stir in 1 cup chopped salted almonds.

45. Banana-Walnut Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1/2 teaspoon apple pie spice to the flour mixture. Replace the sour cream with 1 mashed banana. Stir in 1/2 cup chopped toasted walnuts with the chocolate chips.

46. Walnut-Sweet Potato Roast 1 large sweet potato at 375 degrees F until tender, 1 hour let cool, then peel and mash. Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1 teaspoon cinnamon to the flour mixture. Replace the sour cream with 1 cup of the mashed sweet potato. Use only 3/4 cup chocolate chips and stir in 3/4 cup chopped candied walnuts.

47. Key Lime Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, using only 1 3/4 cups flour add 1/2 cup finely ground graham crackers to the flour mixture. Add 2 tablespoons Key lime juice, 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest and 2 drops green food coloring with the vanilla. Omit the sour cream. Use 3/4 cup each semisweet chocolate chips and white chocolate chips. Whisk 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar with 1 1/2 tablespoons Key lime juice and 1/4 teaspoon lime zest drizzle over the cooled cookies.

48. Lemon Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 1 tablespoon each finely grated lemon zest and juice with the vanilla. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 3/4 cup each milk chocolate chips and white chocolate chips. Whisk 2 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar with 1/4 cup lemon juice and a splash of water if needed dip the cooled cookies halfway into the icing. Top with yellow sprinkles.

49. Birthday Cake Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, using 1 tablespoon vanilla. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 3/4 cup each milk chocolate chips and white chocolate chips stir in 1/4 cup rainbow sprinkles.

50. Matcha-White Chocolate Make Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, adding 2 tablespoons matcha powder to the flour mixture. Use only 1/2 teaspoon vanilla and add 1/4 teaspoon almond extract. Replace the semisweet chocolate chips with 1 cup white chocolate chips.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 cup wheat germ
  • 12 ounces good-quality chocolate, chopped into chunks, or 1 1/2 cups golden raisins, or 10 ounces toffee pieces

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Combine the brown sugar, granulated sugar, and butter in an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Starting with the mixer on low speed and increasing until it is on medium, beat until the mixture is creamy and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the eggs and the vanilla extract, then scrape the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, and mix to combine.

Combine the rolled oats, flour, baking soda, baking powder, and wheat germ in a large bowl, and stir to combine. Add the dry mixture to the butter mixture, then mix on low speed just to combine, 10 to 15 seconds. Remove the bowl from mixer stand, and stir in your choice of chocolate chunks, golden raisins, or toffee pieces.

Line the baking pans with parchment paper. Use a large (2 1/2 ounce) or small (1 1/4 ounce) ice-cream scoop to form balls of dough. Place the balls of dough about 4 inches apart on baking pans. Bake until golden and just set, about 18 minutes for large cookies and 14 minutes for small cookies. Remove from oven let cool on pan 4 to 5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack.


Chocolate Chip Cookie Guide

How do you make the perfect chocolate chip cookie? We tweaked the ingredients and baking methods of our classic recipe to see how we could achieve cookies with different textures and flavors.

Related To:

The Ultimate Cookie Quest

Mess with a Classic

Flour Power

The first change we made to the classic recipe was adding flour and subbing in cake flour for the usual all-purpose variety. Just adding flour made the cookies dense and dry, but the cake flour was a surprising hit. The resulting cookies were tender and super chewy with pleasantly caramelized edges.

The second experiment pertained to the chemical leaveners: We replaced the recipe's baking soda with baking powder. The cookies turned out lighter, crumbly and fragile, which wasn't a desired outcome, as voted by our tasting panel.

Fun with Fats and Sugar

Next, we adapted the ingredients that give cookies their sweetness and, as it turns out, greatly impact their texture. In lieu of standard room-temperature butter, we tried 3/4 cup of coconut oil and melted butter, respectively. The coconut oil yielded a lighter, less toffee-flavored cookie, which made the chocolate chips taste more pronounced and allowed the coconut flavor of the oil to emerge. Melting the butter produced a crackly topped, slightly chewy cookie.

It was the variation in sugars that resulted in the greatest surprise, though. We tried all brown sugar, all granulated sugar, and a combination of brown sugar and corn syrup (more on that last one later). The all dark brown sugar cookie was tender, cakey and notably darker in color.

The Big Chill

The Heat Is On

Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies

After experimenting with all of these variables, our discerning cookie tasters crowned five chocolate chip cookies worthy of their own recipes.

The first, the Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies, resulted from our sugar experiment. They contain 1 1/2 cups of dark brown sugar (in lieu of standard light brown sugar) and no granulated sugar. After baking for 12 to 15 minutes at 375 degrees F, the cookies are incredibly tender.