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Jessica Biel's Au Fudge Restaurant Sued for Allegedly Stealing Tips

Jessica Biel's Au Fudge Restaurant Sued for Allegedly Stealing Tips


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A new lawsuit alleges that actress Jessica Biel and her business partners at Au Fudge in Los Angeles stole more than $430,000 in tips from their employees in addition to denying them meal and rest breaks. According to court documents obtained by People magazine, nine former employees are suing Biel and other restaurant owners — Estee Stanley, Joey Gonzalez, Kimberly Muller, and Jonathan Rollo — after they failed to pay workers the 22 percent gratuity charged for private events at the kid-friendly eatery.

“Each of them had their gratuities wrongfully converted and were improperly denied meal and rest breaks, overtime compensation and earned wages under various illegal payroll practices,” the lawsuit states. “Defendants charged hundreds of thousands of dollars in gratuities to private-party customers and converted said gratuities to themselves in order to pad their own pockets and deprive plaintiffs their compensation in violation of law.”

Au Fudge’s former director of events, Alexandra Desage, is not listed as a plaintiff on the lawsuit, but she says she did confront co-owner Jon Rollo about restaurant management pocketing staff tips. The Blast reports that Rollo dismissed Desage’s concerns, saying, “I don’t think you understand. Don’t worry about it.”

People reports that the plaintiffs are seeking $430,100 in missing gratuities and $31,549 in missed rest breaks, in addition to $1,000,000 in punitive damages. The sum of gratuities stems from industry events at the restaurant for companies like Netflix and Amazon. A Netflix event in July 2016 with a bill of $80,220.19 included $13,271.50 in “gratuity” that the employees say they never received.

Many restaurants charge a standard gratuity for large parties, but even when the tip isn’t spelled out on the bill, it’s important to understand what’s expected of you as a customer, no matter where you are in the world. Here’s the complete guide to tipping abroad: hotels, restaurants, taxis, and more.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.


Jessica Biel's Restaurant Sued by Workers for Wage Theft

Celebrities don't always make the best restaurateurs just ask Eva Longoria or Flavor Flav. But you'd at least hope that they'd pay their employees properly and pass on the tips those employees earned.

But nine current and former employees at Jessica Biel's Au Fudge restaurant in Los Angeles are suing the actress and five other partners in the business, alleging they were denied gratuities and rest breaks. And they're asking for at least a million bucks.

The bulk of Au Fudge's income, which, as Radar Online reported, has yet to turn a profit, came from private events or so-called "buyouts" for companies like Amazon, Netflix, and others. And, like any large group going to a restaurant, they were charged automatic gratuity, normally 22 percent, which came to $14,630 in Amazon's case and $13,271.50 for Netflix. But the plaintiffs claim they never saw a dime of those tips, and were allegedly told by co-owner Jon Rollo, "Don't worry about it."

The suit claims employees were shorted around $430,100 in gratuities from the special events, and lost out on an additional $31,549 in rest breaks they claim the restaurant denied them. They're also asking for at least $1,000,000 in punitive damages.

The nine employees who filed the suit were allegedly part of the team that opened Au Fudge, "young adults new to the workforce and new to Los Angeles," who worked at the restaurant "as a way to get by" while "trying to begin a career in the entertainment industry." "Plaintiffs were unfamiliar with workers' rights," the suit contends, "and were ill-prepared to deal with violations of their rights in the workplace."

But they've take to the wage theft lawsuit like a fish to water, with receipts of the unpaid gratuities and affidavits attesting to management and ownership's dismissal of their claims. Biel and her partners had no comment regarding the suit.



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