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No More $5 Footlongs: Subway 12-Inch Sandwiches Now Cost $6

No More $5 Footlongs: Subway 12-Inch Sandwiches Now Cost $6


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Subway has officially announced the end of the $5 footlong era, and is bumping up the price to $6 for the February promotion

Subway sacrifices an alliterative deal, and we sacrifice a dollar.

Subway’s $5 footlong promotion is almost as iconic as the odor of the sandwich chain’s bread. This year, for the first time, Subway will only be offering $6 footlongs throughout the month of February.

This shouldn’t come as much of a shock to Subway fans, because the sandwich chain has been phasing out the $5 footlong deal for a while now. Most of the footlong prices were raised to $5.25 or $5.50 last year, with fewer options available to customers.

All classic menu items will be available for $6 until the end of the month, and can be combined as part of a meal deal.

Predictably, Subway customers are none too pleased about this menu change:

Can I get a 5$ footlong? "Yes that will be 7.50$" "What the fu*k?"

— Misty Marking (@MistyMarking) February 3, 2016

Some suspect a conspiracy theory may be afoot:

@ArsonByLarson isn't it interesting when @SUBWAY gets called out 4 not providing true 12" long subs, shortly afterwards their price goes up

— Douglas Friedel (@d_friedel) February 3, 2016

Subway has tried to appease the angry Twitter mob with an explanation, but people aren’t convinced:

Y'all fake. $5 footlong sounds way better than $6 https://t.co/7Hl8Utjys7

— Petty Pr0ud (@emberry9517) February 3, 2016


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Subway Will Make Sure That Footlong Sub Is Actually a Foot Long Following Lawsuit

The epic court battle between Subway and angry customers who claimed their footlong sub sandwiches were not actually a full 12 inches long is finally over.

In 2013, a group of people sued the world's biggest restaurant chain to get Subway to change its practices — either ensuring the sandwiches lived up to the 12-inch claims or to stop using the "footlong" label. Final approval for the settlement was granted on February 25, according to the Associated Press Subway has agreed to take steps over the next four years to ensure its bread is reaching its full 12-inch potential. And yes, one of those steps will be requiring restaurants to use a measuring device for the bread .

The chain will also pay a whopping $520,000 in attorney fees, plus $500 each to the 10 people who headed up the lawsuit. (Sorry, all you other Subway customers are fresh out of luck on this one.) As a n attorney for the group that sued Subway stated, "It was difficult to prove monetary damages, because everybody ate the evidence."

Subway's bread is made from measured frozen loaf logs that are thawed and stretched in the restaurant before cooking, leaving room for some size variability. Considering the recent jump in cost of Subway's famed footlong sandwich promo from $5 to $6, those things had better damn well be the advertised size.


Watch the video: Its No Wonder Why Subway Got Rid Of The $5 Footlong (July 2022).


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